Waiting out the Wall – Writers Wednesday

WritersWednesday

Waiting Out the Wall

Many of you know that I am a prolific writer. I write daily, sometimes up to 10,000 words a day. I love writing and it loves me. Until, it doesn’t.

I’ve been writing for about six years. I wrote my first book Dead Awakenings at 150,000 words in 30 days. The next month I wrote another book, also at 150,000 words. The third month I wrote Reign of the Vampires at right around 120,000 words. It was amazing. Splendid. And I was on top of the world! I didn’t write any more books until two and a half years ago. In two and a half years I’ve written a dozen books and published ten of them so far. I was told volume was the name of the game. If I wanted to get my name out there I need to write and write and write some more. So I did.

Along the way I had a writer’s block. Nothing big, small ones. Cute little writer’s blocks that I want to name and put on my shelf. I’d take a week off and then be fine. I’d read a few tips here and there and bam! I was back in the game.

Until a month ago.

A month ago I had a major meltdown. A meltdown like none I’ve had in over eighteen years. It was bad. Really bad. And I finally asked myself. What the hell are you doing? Why are you doing all this? What is the goal? And that’s where it started. My first REAL Writer’s Block ever. A hairy ten foot spider of a writer’s block that I didn’t want to touch let alone put on a shelf and care for.

It was like being stranded in the middle of the ocean of words that wouldn’t come together and form beautiful prose anymore.

 

At first I remembered how comfortable I’d been just days before. Sailing on a cruise ship in this gigantic ocean of words. Partying with all my writer friends and chatting about my WIP, and characters, and putting beautiful words on pages. Only to wake up abandoned on a life raft with limited rations, not a soul in sight and words not only no longer in my mind, but no longer in the ocean that surrounded me either. Nothing. There was just… dark ominous water threatening to swallow me down.

So what did I do? I lay in the bottom of my boat till I hit shore and then I started reading articles about writer’s block and how to get rid of it. Try “What If” Questions. Try writing a character sheet. Move on to a different project. Write through it because the first draft will be crap anyway. But every single thing I read had a common theme: Keep Working.

Now I had friends. My wonderful writer friends whom I love and cherish and they said, “When I get blocked it’s because I deviate too much from my plot.” Well, that’s true, for them, but I’m not a heavy plotter. I can’t be. My characters freak out when I tell them what to do and then they throw a tantrum and stop talking to me. So, what’s a Plotzer type of girl to do when all the advice she’s being given makes her brain throb and the hamster on the wheel in her head pass out?

You stop. That’s right. You stop. Not an hour stop. Or a day stop. Or even a week stop. You take a full stop. A month. Two months. However long you and your body need. You don’t even try. Don’t open your word document and stare at it. Don’t read your Facebook feed full of what all your writer friends are working on. You don’t read books in your genre and analyze them. Don’t promote or market anything! You just stop. You pretend you aren’t an author. You do all those things that never get done because you write so much.

You do the laundry and cook real meals. You go to sleep early and sleep through the night. You go to the store or the mall and walk around and enjoy just being there. You take your kids to violin and parkour and fencing and dance and you don’t take your computer so you can write while you wait. You binge watch every show you haven’t seen in over a year. You talk to friends that aren’t writers and go to lunch with them to hear about normal people. You clean your house and organize the spare bedroom and take the time to be a regular person again.

Yes, it’s true that for the first few days your writer’s brain will fight this change. Tell you that you need to write. You have crap to get done. Ignore it. Drown it out with doing those other things that help you remember who you are. Within a week or so you’ll find that everything inside quiets down and you’ll start to breathe again. You might get an idea or two in this time. Jot them down but nothing more. Don’t write. Don’t plot. Just make a note so you have it for later.

Then, when you’re in those quiet moments, you think about what the heck started it all. Were you pressuring yourself to get it done? Were you pressuring yourself that it wasn’t good enough? Were you too focused on selling more than your friends? Were you upset that someone didn’t invite you to a party or that you got a 2 star review? Most likely you will find that what started it all was pressure. Stress will shut down your creativity faster than being run over by a truck. You can at least get some good sensory descriptions and plot ideas from being run over by a truck. But with stress, not so much.

Then when you’re ready, think about your characters a bit. Not a lot. Just a little. Think about where you left them and what they’re doing. Maybe pull out something you need to edit and edit it. Slow. No pressure to be amazing, just reliving it and making it better here and there. Pick up a book in genres you DO NOT write in. (That is key!!) For me it’s non-fiction. Read them. Learn from them. Have fun with them. Maybe write a blog post. Or an article for a newsletter. Try your had at a short story. Very short. Two thousand words or less. Again, the name of the game is No Pressure. Something light and fun just to see where it goes. Do a daily writing prompt and turn it into a thousand word flash fiction for your blog. No commitment. You are a free agent here!

And then when you think you’re ready to start writing again, to dive back into that monster of a novel you’re writing, Don’t. Don’t do it. You aren’t ready.

Take a few more days. Do more things. Go to a play or your son’s soccer game. Make cookies for your neighbors. And just take time to remember who you were before you started calling yourself an author. Let yourself be.

I know you’re asking, okay, so when do I start writing again? The answer is, when holding back will kill you. When that feeling that if you don’t get the screaming characters in your head to shut up that you might put an icepick through your temple. That’s when you write. When the need is so overwhelming that you can no longer hold back that sea of words that has finally come back to you and is ready to help you back onto your cruise ship. That’s when you begin again.

But what if you can’t wait it out? What if you’re on a deadline? Then what do you do? You take as much time as you can and then you start slowly. Do the small things above. Think of your characters in your book. Do character sheets and maybe go on Pinterest and look for inspiration. Make a board for your characters. Do a small writing prompt and pop your characters into it. It doesn’t have to be a scene you will use in your book, but it can be a scene you could use as promo or a freebie in your newsletter. Ultimately, if you are on a deadline you can’t wait forever and sometimes what you’ll need to do most after taking your break is forcing yourself to sit down and write again. After you’ve taken sufficient time out, you need to recommit and dedicate yourself to your writing again. Go back and read the last book in the series. Re-read the chapters you’ve already written. Remind yourself why you loved these characters so much.

But first, give yourself time to heal and to be. And when you are ready, go into it for the love of writing. The love of wanting to just write and create and have fun. For you. Not to get a contract or an agent. Not to fulfill a contract in place or to submit to an anthology. Not to make a million dollars.

Write because if you don’t, your characters will murder you in your sleep.

Rebekah R. Ganiere – Books with a Bite

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Editors & Critique Partners & Beta Readers Oh My! Writers Wednesday

WritersWednesday

Hey Everyone!  So there are many things you need to do for your book once you finish it. Now I know that your first draft is amazing. It’s perfect and doesn’t need to be touched but let’s think for a minute that maybe it does. Let’s think that maybe it could be made stronger, nipped, tucked and polished a bit. 

 

A lot of authors make the mistake of trying to get their work out too quick. They query twenty agents and get standard form rejections. Then they move to publishers and get a dozen rejections and think, oh well, I’ll just self publish it. When what they should be doing is taking a step back to figure out why they are being rejected.

 

So here is a quote from Ernest Hemingway:

The first draft of anything is crap! 

 

Now I don’t necessarily agree with him. Not all of it is crap. Some of it is good. But never is it great. And never is it publishable. It takes time and editing to get it great and make it publishable. So what do you do? How do you know how what to do to make it better?

 

People are often surprised to hear how many times I edit a piece before giving it to an editor. So here is my process.

 

I write a draft. It usually takes about a month to write it. Then I let it sit and marinate. After that I edit it all the way through about two to three times. From there I go through my editing checklist and clean up the book. After that I send it out to get critiqued. 

 

Stage One – Critique Partners

You need one amazing or two awesome critique partners to look over your book and tell you exactly what they think. Not your mom or your best friend or your husband – Unless they are a published author. But people who know what they are doing and will tell you the total truth. They should tell you any character, plot, pacing, grammatical and typo issues. They should tell you what they like and do not like. They should kick your butt and tell you everything that is wrong with your book along with what is right. And you should not take it personally. They are trying to help you. They want you to succeed. 

 

Stage Two – You Edit

After you get those critiques back you edit it again with your partners’ notes. You don’t have to take all of their notes but you do need to at least keep an open mind to them. After you have edited the story again, you are almost done. You may feel at this point you’re done. That it is as good as it is going to get. But hold on.

 

Stage Three A – Editor 

At this point you may decide to hire a freelance editor to look at it. There are different kinds of editors so make sure you get the right one. A developmental editor will look at your overall story and plot and characters and tell you any problems. Copy Editors look for grammatical, plot, typo and other kinds of problems. Smaller than the big story or plot. Proofreaders simply look for typo and grammatical errors, that’s all. I suggest you get recommendations for editors instead of just picking one from the internet. Also most editors will do a free sample so they can see your writing and you can see their style. Always get a free sample. Look at their credentials and any recommendations they may have. There are a lot of people who call themselves editors that shouldn’t be. Be proactive in your search and make sure you find a good fit for you. What might work for your friend may not be what you need.

 

Stage Three B – Beta Readers

If you choose to skip paying an editor then you go to Beta Readers. Beta Readers are different than Critique partners. Your beta readers will give you their overall impressions of the book. Did they like it? Did they not? Where there characters they didn’t like or inconsistencies you missed. They will also grab any last typos for you. I usually have a minimum of 3 beta readers because 3 sets of eyes are better than one at this stage.

 

Stage Four – You Edit

This is it. Your last pass. You go through it and edit all the things your beta readers caught. Then maybe you go through it another time. Or maybe you want to never look at it again and you set it aside. 

 

So now are you done? Nope. Now you write a Logline, Tagline, Blurb and Synopsis. Then you polish the heck out of those. And when that is done, then you have a package ready to go. 

 

Now you notice I didn’t mention critique groups. Those are great but they are no longer in my process because I write too fast and they move to slow. Writer’s groups are a wonderful tool if you get into one with the following criteria. 1) There are published writers in the group. 2) The people are there to do more than just get your approval 3) They know how to critique.

Critique groups can be very helpful but beware because everyone has their own ideas as to what you should do with your story. You may end up with six conflicting ideas as to what you need to work on. But here is a piece of advice I got that I apply to all critiques and why I always use 2-3 people for everything. 

 

“If two or more people say you’re drunk. You’re Drunk! Sit Down!”

 

What that means is, if two or more people are telling you that you have the same problem with your work, you really should look at it because it’s probably a problem. If one person says it, then think about it and see if you agree. If two or more tell you, then it might have merit. If two people tell you your character has no arc, then they probably don’t. If they tell you that you could do away with a scene, you probably can. People will always have different opinions and they won’t always agree with you, it’s up to you to pick and choose what you want to listen to. But if you go with a publisher, in the end, they will probably have the last say.

 

So what about you? What’s your process after you finish a book?

Is Research Necessary? – Writers Wednesday

WritersWednesday

Is Research Necessary?

Welcome to Writers Wednesday!

When I think of doing research the first thing that springs to mind is a historical novel. But I have learn in writing a dystopian series as well as sci-fi that research can be necessary for just about anything you write.

You hear people say all the time, “write what you know.” But what if you want to write about a sword wielding vampire? Are you a sword wielding vampire? Maybe, but probably not. So how do you write about them?

Or how about the fact that you live in Massachusetts and you want to write about Montana, but you’ve never even been to Montana. How do you do that? Or what if you want to write about a Hollywood Starlet or BDSM or Norse Gods?

The answer is simple. Research.

You have to do research in just about every book you write, unless you are writing exactly what you know. I live in California and even I had to do a few minutes of research when I wanted my characters to meet in downtown Los Angeles. I drive to downtown on a weekly basis. But I don’t drive from the 10 to Hollywood Blvd in rush hour all the time. So I had to research how long that would take. Research is inherent to your writing unless you are making everything up yourself.

So if you are going to research where do you start? How far do you go? How much do you use? When do you stop?

Well, how do you know if you need to research? If you don’t know something, you need to research it. That is, if you want to be accurate. If you don’t know the name of the Chinese dynasty from the third century, find out. If you don’t know the proper street names of the business district in Chicago, research it. If you don’t know the difference between a parry and a thrust in a sword fight, find out.

Yes, there are times you can try to fudge it, but unless you are creating your own world then I don’t recommend it. And you can never fudge it in a historical. They will crucify you. Same with science in a hard core Sci-Fi novel. Don’t even try.

So, now we know we need to research, the question is: Where do we go for the info? Yes, the internet is certainly easy to access and there are thousands of websites to choose from, but you need to vet your sources to make sure they are correct. Just because you google it doesn’t mean it’s true.

When I wanted to incorporate Tesla into one of my stories I first read about him on the internet. Then I went to the library and checked out half a dozen books on him. A library is a great place to get information. Google professors who know about what you are looking up and ask them. Ask on your RWA boards for help. There are dozens of places you can go for help if you just look.

But you need to be careful. I know many authors who research for years and never get their novel finished because of it. Sometimes it is hard to remember that research is there to help you with your novel. Not to become your primary focus.

Lastly, how much do you use in your novel? That’s up to you but I would say for all of the research you do you probably won’t use a tenth of it. And that’s okay. It’s you as an author who needs to know it.

For me, I need to know how to swordplay for my Fairelle series. I have done extensive research on weapons and fencing and battles and injuries and armor. Now you won’t learn about the armor my hero puts on, or how he ties every tie or the buckles he can’t reach that his manservant has to help him with. But you will read my fight scenes and see how realistic they are. You’ll read about the swords they use and not think, “There’s no way she could lift that.” When my guys get injured, it’s realistic. All because of my research. You won’t know why it’s so real, you’ll just know that it isn’t fake.

And that’s what we are going for as a writer and why we do our research. To suspend disbelief in our readers. Anything less with pull them out of the story and possibly write a scathing review about how poorly it was written.

Personally, research is not my favorite thing to do, but I do it to be better. I do it to write better and I do it for my characters. Because in the end, they will kick my butt if I make them look bad.

So tell me some of the most fun things you’ve ever researched for a book? This last week I researched baby names meaning: Devil, Demon, Malevolent, Poisonous, Evil.

The Good, The Bad, The Ugly, It’s Contest Season – Writers Wednesday

WritersWednesday

Welcome back to Writers Wednesday! You know I started out not caring for blogging but over the last few months as I have started publishing the Writers Wednesday posts, I’ve really found that I enjoy talking about writing a bit. So I hope you are getting something out of my posts as much as I am enjoying writing them.

Well this week I want to talk about contests. As I worked on my last newsletter as the Editor of the Fantasy, Futuristic & Paranormal Chapter of RWA I went and looked up on RWA’s website for contests to list and found tons. Tons of contests being offered from cheap to expensive. Probably over thirty to forty contests being offered between now and the end of March. And those are just RWA contests.

Magic book

So when you’re looking at and thinking about contests, what should you look for and why should you do it and what should you be wary of? There are many factors that go into entering a contest and with so many choices there are some things to think about before you put money out there for them.

You enter because you want constructive feedback from industry professionals about your work. This is a good thing! If you make it to the final round agents and editors will most likely be the judge and even if you don’t win you could make some good connections or you could get some great feedback on how to make your book stronger.

  • You enter because you want someone to edit your book for you for free. This is not good. No one will edit your book. They may give you a few things to work on, but they won’t edit it. And most contests only read the first 10-30 pages anyway.
  • You enter so you can impress people with your win and get attention. Again, not a great reason. When agents and editors look at your wins they want to know what contest you won. If you win the Rita, or the Golden Heart, they will take a serious look at you. If you win the Idaho Sweet Potato Jingle award, not so much.
  • Maybe you have been dying to have an agent or editor look at your book and you can’t get their attention but they are one of the finalist judges. That’s a good way to go to get their input before you query.

When looking for a contest to enter there are also things you should look out for because there are a lot of companies out there just looking to make some money and they aren’t looking to help you as an author.

  • Did they solicit you? Run the other way. Companies that come to you and ask you to enter are looking to take your money, hands down.
  • Do they cost more than 50.00 to enter? Run away. Some contests cost 100.00 or more to enter. That’s just ridiculous. They are trying to make money off you. It’s a rip off. Also if they give you a bulk discount if you enter more than one book, also a scam.
  • How man categories do they have? If they are judging more genres than Amazon has, then it’s a scam. Good contests will have a limit to their genres and they will focus around a certain criteria. Maybe the first kissing scene. Maybe the opening of the book. Maybe the introduction to your hero. Or maybe the book as a whole. Good contests are focused.
  • If they won’t tell you who the judges are or their judges aren’t professionals in the industry, I wouldn’t recommend it. Anyone can call themselves a judge, but just like speakers at conferences, what makes them qualified? Make sure the company that is putting on the contest is disclosing all information. They should have the judges lines up for the final round and you should be able to look up those judges to make sure they are reputable.
  • How do you win the contest? Do you get as many of your friends and family to vote for you as possible or are you actually judged by people who read your work and do not know you. There are lots of popularity contests, and that’s fine, but just know what they are. They are different than actual judged contests.
  • What do you get if you win? A trophy? Money? A certificate? Nothing? Reputable contests will give you something if you win. If they don’t, again, beware.

So, should you enter contests? It depends. But one thing you need to keep in mind is, no matter how good or reputable the contest is, you are going to get varying opinions on your work. You will get initial round of 3 judges who will tell you what they think about your work. Sometimes they will say the same thing, sometimes they will say completely different things. Then you will get two or three final round judges who will do the same thing. One may love it, two may not. It just depends. And you have to decide, just like a writer’s group or critique partners, if you agree with what is said, or if you think it is just one person’s opinion and nothing more. Contests are a great way to get feedback. They are also a great way to confuse the heck out of you if you don’t know how to interpret what they are telling you.

But I caution you. 30.00 + 20.00 + 40.00 + 25.00 adds up fast! So be careful of how much you are spending and what you are getting for the money. Contests can also become addictive. If you start winning then you enter everything to try and collect as many wins as you can and you never actually do anything with the book that’s not a good thing. The object of writing a book is to get it out there. There are plenty of contests that can be entered with already published works. Plus all the time you spend searching out and applying for contests is time taken away from actual writing. And you want to limit that as much as possible.

Lastly, be aware of the rules of contests. Some are for published, some unpublished. Some you can publish your book but not until the end of the contest. Some you can publish but not before the final round starts. They all have formatting they require. They all have rules on when, how and who to send to. Make sure you follow those rules to the letter because a lot of contests will disqualify you and not refund you money if you do it wrong.

So, have you entered any contests? What did you think?

Rebekah R. Ganiere – Books with a Bite

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Showing Your Villains a little Love! – Writers Wednesday

WritersWednesday

Showing Your Villains a little Love!

How many times have you read a book, seen a movie or watched a TV Show and loved or absolutely hated the Villain? There is nothing better than a well played, well fleshed out villain who isn’t a cardboard cutout of what evil is supposed to look like. I’ve rooted for the villains since Dracula came along. Darth Vader is my father!

As writers our villain is as important as our hero and heroine. Their story, whether told or not, is also as important.

So what makes a good villain? One that you can identify with and root for? Is it someone who resembles your junior high PE teacher? Or maybe the one who acts just like the undeserving jerk who stole your girl friend in high school? There are a lot of things that can make you love or hate a villain, but the biggest one is that they aren’t evil. They’re humanized.

sweeney-todd

One of the villains that I rooted for the most was Sweeney Todd. You say he isn’t the villain? Really? He murders people, cuts them up and makes them into pies. Sound like a good guy to you? Not so much. But let’s look at how he got to that place. His wife was taken from him, he was thrown into jail under false charges and then he finds out his wife was raped and died and his daughter is being raised by the man behind it all. All those things that happened to him, make him so sympathetic that as he’s killing people you are gleefully cheering him on! Sympathy or empathy for the villain is a great way to make people love them.

LokiThorTheDarkWorld

Another of my favorites is Loki. Sigh…Loki! He’s the brother of Thor. Always second best and second fiddle to his big brother with the golden hair. Yet we find out that he’s actually adopted. And not just adopted, but adopted from the one race that he’s been taught to hate and loathe his entire life. That sucks. And it makes you feel for him. He no longer has a sense of identity. Does he do terrible things, yeah, he does. But he has one of the best senses of humor I’ve ever seen. And when push comes to shove, he does the right thing–most of the time. Not always, but when it counts. On top of that, did you see the scene when he found out his mom was dead. I cried. He was devastate. He loved his mother more than anything. That right there humanizes him and makes us love him.

jaime_lannister

How about Jamie Lannister from Game of Thrones? There is a despicable man! Incest, murder, attempted murder of a child. You name it. Yet, after a dreadful injury he forms an unlikely friendship with Lady Breann. He protects her virtue, saves her life and then gives her one of the most precious things he owns. How can you not love a man like that? You know they’ve done horrible things, but deep down, he’s not a bad person. What about the Hound? He protects, Arya Stark.

So what are some things you need to make a great villain? Well, we’ve already talked about humanizing them. Every villain had a mother who loved them at one time. They have kids, maybe a spouse, people who don’t realize what monsters they are. They care for those people. Love those people. And would do anything to protect those people. Or dog, some villains just really love their dogs. Like Woody Harellson from Seven Psychopaths.

Kingpin-Daredevil-Netflix

Remember, most villains don’t see themselves as villains. They think they are doing a good thing. Take Wilson Fisk, Kingpin, from Netflix Daredevil series. Wilson Fisk thought he was trying to make Hell’s Kitchen a better place. But he was actually the reign of terror in that city. Displacing old ladies, killing people who got in his way. He was the villain.

Now does that mean you can’t just have a totally sadistic twisted villain who enjoys being mean? Nope, not at all! Cough, cough–Umbridge from Harry Potter and Marie Lalaurie from American Horror Story Coven. Sadistic, twisted and loving to inflict pain. But what did they cover it up with? Smiles, jokes, pink and kittens and parties. Those are some seriously developed villains. Dumpy, unassuming, small voices, yet two of the craziest witches I’ve ever seen made into characters!

Humanizing a villain makes them real, tangible, not just a character. Give a glimpse of those intimate moments when they think no one is looking and they do something nice, caring, loving. Having an evil villain or even one who thinks that they are doing bad things for the greater good, is great, but giving us a villain we are torn about, now that is a great character!

Rebekah R. Ganiere – Books with a Bite

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5 Things to do Before Your Book Publishes! – Writers Wednesday

WritersWednesday

5 Things to do Before Your Book Publishes!

Welcome to the Fourth part of my series on Self publishing.If you missed the first blog post in this series you can find it HERE,
The Second is HERE, The Third is HERE.

So we discussed a few things to look out for when self publishing. And five things you need to do for yourself as an author before publishing. Now I’m going to tell you Five Things your book needs before you publish it.

ipadcover

1)A Newsletter – A newsletter list is your best friend. The people on it WANT to hear what you are saying and doing. Unlike paid ads where you never know what you are going to get, these people went through the trouble of signing up. There’s a reason and those contacts are invaluable! When you set up a newsletter give people something free. A short story or article or something to help them get to know you and your writing style and to get them hooked. Then send one out every month to two months. Any longer and people might forget they signed up.

2)A Media Kit – Media kits for you and your books are also a must have. They make life so much easier when it’s time to send things out for promo. In your media kit, if it’s about you have your bio, headshot and accomplishments as well as a possible writing sample as be sure to include all your social media links for people to contact you at. If it’s for a book have the cover, ISBN, length and genre of book, links, expert (both long and short), blurb, your bio and headshot. Also include teaser graphics for them to put up. Put it all in a word doc and pdf. You never know which people will want.

3)ARCs – Get them out there! You need people to review your book. In the first week of release you need 15-20 reviews. It will help push your book up through the ranks. Ask bloggers, friends, street team members, reviewers to read and review your book. You will need to have it in different formats for people who read on kindle or nook. Instafreebie is a great website to use for this because people have to add their information to get a free copy. This is great for avoiding pirating and to get contact information to add to your newsletter.

4)Street Team – You need one. A street team is a dedicated group of followers that love your work and want to help spread the word about it. Start gathering street team members early so you can have people help you with promoting your book. Provide them with ARCs and teasers and links and ask them to post them on Facebook groups and pages.

5)Ads and Marketing – You need to market. Why? Because if you don’t no one will. There are lots of free promo sites out there that will blast out your book if it’s free or .99 for the first week. Find them. Use them. If you are going to spend money on ads and marketing, do your research and make sure that you are using people and places that will actually help you grow your fan base and sell books. Do NOT spend 2 weeks straight blasting on your Facebook page that you are SELLING A BOOK! Or on Twitter. People will Not appreciate it. Yes, find Facebook groups to promo in. Yes, you can even buy Facebook ads. But be knowledgeable about who you are using. Some blog tour companies are amazing and will work hard for you, others will take your money. Be sure to get referrals and use them.

Marketing your book should start 3-6 months before release. Cover releases, excerpts, extra tidbits and information, deleted scenes and teasers. All of them can be used to help get the word out there about your book. But it must be done in advance. If you wait till it’s released, your’e already doomed.

So what do you think? What are some things that you have done before release that I didn’t mention?

Rebekah R. Ganiere – Book with a Bite

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Cupid’s Curse Release Day!!

 

Cupid's Curse  BookLinks

Amazon: http://amzn.to/1ZOWNzi
iBooks: http://apple.co/1OLr8vz
B&N: http://bit.ly/1VmrgUb
Kobo: http://bit.ly/1UnvA5h

 

Blurb

Raine’s a Fae with no magic. Banished to live among “Mundanes” in the human world she works as an Inquisitor for Otherworlders. And she is having a very bad start to her New Year!

Her dragon Sam wants a girlfriend. Her weretiger boyfriend Jordan is being strangely hormonal. And old enemies are emerging from the woodwork, forbidding Slade, her only friend, from giving her any magical assistance.

Things start to look up when Cupid offers Raine a job with a fat paycheck- if, before Valentine’s Day, she finds the person screwing with his dating service and getting his clients killed.

But Raine isn’t the only one trying to figure out what’s going on. The Guardians have their eyes trained on Raine. And as the Otherworlder version of the Secret Police, she can’t afford to get on their bad side.

Raine must discover who wants Cupid to close his doors for good, and deal with Jordan’s sudden need to take a Valentine’s Day trip to Vegas, all while trying to keep herself out off everyone’s hit list.

Excerpt

Raine reached for her pants. Jordan’s large warm arms wrapped around her waist and he turned her to face him.

“Hey.” His deep voice soothed her.

She held back the tears in an effort to keep from showing weakness. She never talked about her parents. Or her home plane. Or anything having to do with where she’d come from. Not even with Jordan.

He tilted her chin with his calloused finger and forced her to look into his deep green eyes.

“Are you okay?” His voice was gentle as a spring rain.

“Yeah, I’m great. My parents who haven’t spoken to me in over four years just sent me a letter demanding that I help a stupid sprite with some problem probably involving the fact that her bubbles are the wrong color in her washing machine.”

Jordan’s chuckle purred in his chest and rumbled through her like a bass drum.

“I didn’t know sprites had washing machines.”

She pushed away from him. “You know what I mean.” She was in no mood to be chided.

He pulled her back into a tight embrace. “Come on darlin’. It’s going to be okay.”

His warmth smothered her but the connection was exactly what she needed. Over the last month things had been weird with Jordan. He’d been busier than usual with work and his pack and his dad. She didn’t want to believe that his sudden distance had anything to do with her and in moments like these, when he held her tight, she almost believed that she wasn’t at fault.

His hard body sent a thrill through her. Sex with Jordan was intense and wild and she could never get enough. She clung to him, her nails digging into his back.

“Hey now,” he said. “You know scratching gets me all fired up.” He nuzzled her neck trailing his warm lips down to her collarbone.

Goosebumps rose all over her body and she shied away from him and giggled.

“Did you just giggle?” he asked.

“No.” She feigned horror. “I never giggle.”

“Oh really?” He bent down and licked up the line of her throat up to her ear.

Her breath caught and she tried to form thoughts that didn’t involve Jordan being naked.

He nibbled around the side of her ear and up to the pointed sensitive tip. Her legs weakened and warmth pooled between her thighs.

“I love your ears.” He flicked his tongue into the inner rim. “They’re so much like a tiger’s.”

Shockwaves of pleasure shot through her. She grabbed the back of his head and pulled his hair. When his eyes met hers they were the fiery orange glow of his tiger.

His smile broadened. “Don’t do that if you don’t want to play. You know I like it rough darlin’.”

“Ewww…get a room,” said Sam.

“This is our room,” growled Jordan, his eyes never leaving hers.

“I’ll just go in my room then,” said Sam. “Maybe I can find a re-run of Game of Thrones. Those female dragons make my scales tingle. Fiesty.”

“Out!” Alpha dominance poured off Jordan in rivulets. The predatory nature of his muscular body exuded sex and made Raine’s temperature spike.

Sam left muttering about sexy wing spans.

It’d been too long since she’d felt Jordan’s skin on hers. Ten days and five hours to be exact. She needed him. Letting go of his hair she slipped her hands under his shirt raking her nails down his back. “So, I shouldn’t do something like this?”

His eyes closed and he shivered, letting out a low growl. “Raine,” his voice was tight as a drum and the sound of her name on his lips made her weak.

She slid her hands inside his low slung jeans and grabbed his firm buttocks. “Say my name again,” she whispered.

He opened his eyes and they’d gone to slits like a cat’s. His intense gaze, softened and he crushed her against him. “Raine.”

His hard length pressed against her belly and she shivered in anticipation. She pushed her hips into his and his hands molded onto her rear. His gaze locked on hers for a moment longer and then he attacked.

Dropping her to the bed her covered her mouth with his, claiming her lips. Her feet hung off the too small bed and the box spring groaned under his weight.

Need wound tight inside her and she fiddled with his belt buckle. She bit his neck, on the tendon and swirled her tongue down the length of his throat.

“Raine.” His voice came out more animalistic growl than human. He grabbed the headboard and it creaked under his grip. The nails from his right hand dug deep into her hip.

She stopped licking him. Crap!

AuthorBio

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Rebekah is an Award Winning Bestselling Author. Her debut novel Dead Awakenings, hit the bestseller list the first day, in January 2014. Her Fairelle Series, released in May 2014 and has won several awards including the Golden Palm and a finalist for Rone Award. Her trilogy The Society was released by Kensington in 2014 and her new series Shifter Rising is releasing April 12th 2016 from Samhain Press.

Rebekah is currently working on six series in the Fantasy, Paranormal Romance, Urban Fantasy, Sci-fi genres. She has five books releasing in 2016.

Rebekah is the President Elect of the FF&P Chapter. In her spare time when she isn’t writing you can find her teaching on SavvyAuthors.com or at RWA. Rebekah also cosplays with her kids and is a guest speaker and panelist at San Diego Comic Con and Salt Lake Comic Con and several other Comic Cons on the west coast as well as LTUE, Romantic Times Convention, and Authors After Dark.

AuthorLinks

Want to catch up on the Otherworlder Series? Book One, Saving Christmas is available for only $.99!!

Saving Christmas

Amazon: http://amzn.to/1KJcAJ3
iBooks: http://apple.co/1SeZuLU
B&N: http://bit.ly/1JKeVIU
Kobo: http://bit.ly/1OTzYaN